Seneca Falls deserves some respect

Posted by Georgia Ann Mullen on November 10, 2016 | Leave a comment (0)

A newsy article about Seneca Falls, NY, the setting for my first historical novel, turned up in the Washington Post recently. Debra Bruno starts out by declaring that “If Concord, Mass., is the home of the “shot heard round the world” in the American Revolution, and Gettysburg was a bloody turning point in the Civil War, then Seneca Falls deserves a more prominent place on the map.” Exactly.

But, since neither guns nor blood were involved in the 1848 First Woman’s Rights Convention poor little sleepy Seneca Falls remains a byword in American history.

The wall commemorating the women (and a few men) who signed the conventions's Declaration of Sentiments.

The wall commemorating the women (and a few men) who signed the conventions’s Declaration of Sentiments.

I lived about 90 minutes from Seneca Falls and visited several times to research my books, visit the Women’s Rights National Historical Park and stroll through the reconstructed Wesleyan Chapel where the convention was held. Erected about town are statues of 19th century women’s rights activists, such as the one pictured here of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Amelia Bloomer and Susan B. Anthony. One summer I rented an authentic replica of a canal boat to motor down the Erie Canal with my daughter and a friend. The highlight of my visits, however, was a tour of Stanton’s home, which really drove home Lizzy’s personality and outlook on life. Don’t miss it.

Statues of Amelia Bloomer introducing Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Susan B. Anthony on a Seneca Falls street corner. I had to get in on the group hug.

Statues of Amelia Bloomer introducing Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Susan B. Anthony on a Seneca Falls street corner. I had to get in on the group hug.



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